Thursday, April 28, 2011

Ha!



Okay, so not funny because sadly it's true and there are people out there like this.

10 comments:

Drillrider said...

I laughed until I CRIED!!!!! Soooooo stinking hilarious!!!!

Sarah G said...

I am not even a horse person and I lol'd at this!
I love people from craiglist/Kijiji. :')

BigGreenGirl said...

Wow, just wow- this was too spot on! Thanks for sharing!

Snowhawk Przhevalsky said...

*facepalmfacepalmfacepalm*

Terry said...

Sad, funny, and too true!!!

Lisa said...

Everyone at work and in other parts of my life know that I am horsey. They ask me if they should get their daughter/wife a horse, and I say absolutely not! I explain how much time, money, heartache and pain goes into caring for a horse for each and every minute spent in the saddle. It turns them off!

Agisting in Sydney on the cheap has brought me into contact with some interesting types - the parents who buy a pony for their kids and they had no idea, leaving the poor thing unattended for weeks on end (it was pasture board with no supervision). I must admit my friends and I ended up 'stealing' these ponies and horses to ride ourselves, even out hacking on the roads! Tsk.

WishIHadAHorsey said...

Very funny!

RiderWriter said...

Howling with laughter, thanks for sharing! Boy, wouldn't we all love to dish out such a response in real life? "You. Are. An. Idiot." etc.

You of all people know how, ahem, CHEAP, a rescue horse can be...:-)

Dom said...

OMG... I deal with this daily. Ugh.

achieve1dream said...

I just read something really interesting and thought I would share . . .

Excess calcium could also make magnesium less available to the horse. [The symptoms of inadequate magnesium are the same as those of excessive ionized calcium. These include irritability, hypersensitivity, muscular symptoms from twitching to spasm, with a potential for GI symptoms and heart irregularity when severe. Horses with moderate magnesium deficiency are often misdiagnosed as EPSM. Other magnesium responsive clinical symptoms I have seen are gait disturbances, including stilted gait, base wide gait behind, difficulty controlling the hind end when turning and reluctance or inability to canter. The magnesium deficient horse is not a happy camper! Eleanor Kellon, VMD] -- reference http://www.hoofrehab.com/diet.htm

Have you tested Denali's feed/forage or her blood levels (if that's possible with horses)? Just a thought, in case it hasn't been covered yet.